Lunch in Paris
Lunch in Paris

Lunch in Paris

Lunch in Paris

Unfortunately Coffs Harbour isn’t all blue skies, sun and surf, for the last week we have had consistent rain and howling wind. To add insult to injury I have had a miserable cold, and haven’t felt like doing anything.  So what have I done this last week… I have lulled about the house with the air conditioning on “high” reading “Lunch in Paris” a true story by Elizabeth Bard.

It is a cute little book which describes the life of the author, a Jewish American girl who meets a French man while working in Europe. She has no French and is seen as a typical boisterous American by the French.  Bit by bit she learns the language, customs, and culture, and starts fitting in to her new country.

The book is centered around French culture and food, and the author has included the recipes which are significant to each chapter.  So as you are reading the book your kitchen can smell like her little flat in Paris.

There is a bit of humour splattered about, particularly when her parents come to visit, or when she finds that her perfectly constructed French phrase actually means “tie me up and spank me,” instead of “could you please correct my mistakes.”

I enjoyed the book, it was light and easy to read. It gave me the feeling that I had managed to have a little French holiday.

I am now looking for a new book to read, so if you would like my copy of “Lunch in Paris” suggest a book you have enjoyed recently. Use the comments section below. Tell me why you liked the book, and briefly what is was about. I will choose a recipient from the responses. Don’t include your address, I will email you.

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Comments

  1. Hi Julie
    I came across your site because we have Cheesemaking in common – I attended the workshop in Sydney run by Lyn’s sister Sue who is equally helpful in the after sales service department.

    In response to your post asking for reading suggestions:

    Lundh in Paris is a delightful book! I have just finished reading “The Gourmet” by Muriel Barbery. A movie has been made of her novel “The Elegance of the Hedgehog”

    “The Gourmet” is about the last 24 hours of a famous food critic and his search for an elusive flavour. We read about many of his most memorable meals and food experiences as he tries to relive a particular moment in his life, one that he cannot quite place. The descriptions of these meals is mouth watering!

    We learn about the man himself from fragments of thoughts from the minds of the people around him, those he lives with, those he works with, those who have loved him.

    At the end of the novel there are questions for discussion for book groups – or for the individual reader to consider. The copy I had borrowed from my local library als had snippets of “the Hedgehog” included and that was a bonus.

    I hope you manage to get hold of a copy of this -it is salivating reading.

    BTW – my first camembert didn’t turn out so well – I like your suggestion of drying them out on a rack, rather than in their container.

    All the best

  2. “Lunch in Paris” sounds like a book I’d enjoy. I’ve been searching for a good read, so I might check it out at the shops today! Vikki’s “The Gourmet” sounds just as interesting. They both seem perfect for foodies like us!

  3. Hi, I’ve been dying to read this book but havent got around to buying a copy just yet. I have a copy of Rosewater & Soda Bread by Marsha Mehran that you would also love, it too is a sotry about a stranger in a foreign land & focuses on delicious food

  4. Hi Julie
    I came across your site because we have Cheesemaking in common – I attended the workshop in Sydney run by Lyn’s sister Sue who is equally helpful in the after sales service department.

    In response to your post asking for reading suggestions:

    Lundh in Paris is a delightful book! I have just finished reading “The Gourmet” by Muriel Barbery. A movie has been made of her novel “The Elegance of the Hedgehog”

    “The Gourmet” is about the last 24 hours of a famous food critic and his search for an elusive flavour. We read about many of his most memorable meals and food experiences as he tries to relive a particular moment in his life, one that he cannot quite place. The descriptions of these meals is mouth watering!

    We learn about the man himself from fragments of thoughts from the minds of the people around him, those he lives with, those he works with, those who have loved him.

    At the end of the novel there are questions for discussion for book groups – or for the individual reader to consider. The copy I had borrowed from my local library als had snippets of “the Hedgehog” included and that was a bonus.

    I hope you manage to get hold of a copy of this -it is salivating reading.

    BTW – my first camembert didn’t turn out so well – I like your suggestion of drying them out on a rack, rather than in their container.

    All the best

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